Update your Operating System

On June 11th 2013, Apple unveiled the next version of iOS – the Apple device operating Imagesystem. The new system will update the current device functionality and enable new services. What about your business operating system? Have you been thinking about updating how your business operates to improve your functionality, improve quality, and enable new services?

Your company is just like Apple.  The market moves ahead and your customers are always expecting more. Your customers’ needs change, competition changes and the way you operate needs to adjust along with them.

Find out what customers are expecting and how well you measure up:

  • Implement a metrics driven review of customer needs. Track Net Promoter Score and benchmark your company’s performance.
  • Understand what’s new in the market. Talk to your customers about the way they would like to do business with you.
  • Look closely: what are your customers are collectively saying and note any patterns or trends.

Uncover sources of customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction inside your organization:

  • Optimize processes to determine the most efficient workflow, reducing wasted time and resources.
  • Define the key operational process metrics that lead to customer satisfaction, such as on-time delivery, back-orders, or returns.
  • Determine the cost of quality in your organization. Find ways to eliminate double- or triple-checking of a single step in the process.

Keep up with the times and remember to continuously innovate:

  • Innovate your business processes from supply chain to ordering to customer delivery. Make use of mobile technologies and automation to streamline the information flow and get real-time updates.
  • Create new services to improve your connection to the customer, create repeat business, and generate new revenue streams.
  • Need ideas? Read the article 3 Ways Mid-Market Companies Can Innovate

Updating the way you do business is just another way to take care of your customers, employees and yourself. Think back to when you started the company, or took over as the CEO, COO or CFO – you wanted to leave your mark on the company by making things better, and changing the status quo. It’s time to do it again!

DataKey Difference: Our passion is helping our clients accelerate their financial and business objectives. Our goal is to give you the tools for lasting and self-sustaining advancement. Over the last 10 years, DataKey has successfully completed hundreds of projects across 30+ different industries for mid-market and Fortune 1000 companies. As a measure of client satisfaction, over 90% of our clients reengage on multiple projects. Contact us today for a free initial consultation and see how we can help your business thrive.

Getting Out the Gate: Driving Internal Change

 Inertia is a difficult force to overcome. Driving internal change is dependent on a company’s ability to mobilize behind an objective, make continual progress, and see the project through to the end. And no one person can enact change on their own; to truly be successful, change must have support throughout the entire organization. Almost every company has struggled with internal change. Even with a brilliant strategy and enthusiastic leadership, all too often those leaders will find themselves in the frustrating position of being within sight of the finish line but unable to reach it. This is rarely due to shortcomings of individuals or of the plan itself, but rather due to the nature of the beast. Change is hard.

Typically, the leadership of a company has a clear picture of where the business needs to be in a certain timeframe. Grow this division to $500M in revenues in 5 years, or double the volume growth rate of a particular product line by next fiscal year. With a goal in mind, the management team sets to devising a plan to reach that goal, or maybe brings in an outside consultant to provide unbiased expertise. A plan is wrought, everyone seems to be on board, but soon it’s apparent that something’s not working. Progress reaches a plateau and won’t budge for weeks. Meetings are spent rehashing the same old issues instead of focusing on what’s next. Before long, the project is abandoned and it’s back to the drawing table. What went wrong?

Unsuccessful internal change is generally the result of a variety of factors which compound to prevent real change from ever getting out of the gate. Change requires organization, planning, socialization, flexibility, and dedication. It requires an understanding that it’s not going to be easy, and that there may be bumps along the way. It requires accountability, tracking, risk management, and good old fashioned hard work. Most of all, change requires confidence.

Everyone involved must believe that they, as individuals and as a team, have the ability to push through difficult or uncomfortable situations in order to reach a common goal.

To drive successful change throughout your organization:

  • Start with a comprehensive plan. Detailed, measureable, achievable goals are great, but also consider risks and countermeasures to anticipate and resolve problems before they happen. Do you foresee clashes in the personalities involved or opposition to tinkering with long-standing processes? The more you are prepared for in advance, the easier it will be to address issues as they surface.
  • Set your team up for success with the right tools to assign responsibility and track progress against goals. Goals should have clear ownership by individuals. Regular status meetings give everyone the chance to share successes and will keep each team member accountable for delivering on time.
  • Before implementing a plan, socialize it with all of the key stakeholders. Make sure that everyone the plan depends on is bought in, from the top of the management chain all the way to the mail room. Even an entry-level employee can undermine a major initiative if there is not broad support and dedication established.
  • Make it a priority. Management needs to be vocal about why this initiative is important and how it will benefit everyone within the company, and also needs to solicit (and react to) feedback. Employees must have confidence that the project is supported by the people at the top, and that those people will do what it takes to make sure it’s successful, even if it means taking constructive criticism.
  • Always be looking to improve. Once the process is complete, reflect back on which aspects were successful, which weren’t, and why. Document this learning and be sure to incorporate the lessons from this project into the next.

DataKey Difference: Strengthens and energizes client organizations by becoming part of the team to accelerate key initiatives.  Sometimes change requires an outside catalyst to really make it stick. DataKey integrates unbiased leadership and world-class expertise directly into your team to get the results you need fast. With proven tools, dedicated capacity, and best practice experience, DataKey can help your team hit the ground running.

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